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I didn't much like Eyes Wide Shut when I first saw it. But Stanley Kubrick movies can grow on you, and I've re‑watched EWS a couple of times to see what more there is to find in it. I still think the story is thin and I don't like Tom Cruise's acting—but the lighting, camerawork, and editing impress me more every time I see it. I've watched a ton of movies since 1999, I've seen a lot of what I consider fine cinematography, but the more I learn about the art the more I feel that Stanley Kubrick was in a class by himself. It wasn't just a matter of being talented, it was his attention to every detail and his readiness to devote whatever time or effort it took to get what he was looking for.

Among other themes, Eyes Wide Shut deals with parallels between waking life and dreams. A fair amount of what goes on in the world does remind me of dreams. From the ongoing Oracle v. Google trial:
Judge Alsup:The G part stands for GNU?
Jonathan Schwartz:Yes.
Judge Alsup:That doesn't make any sense.
A long time ago, I read something that listed planting a tree among several recommended character-building experiences. It didn't say why. I guess it was supposed to be obvious that it makes you think long-term.

If planting a tree broadens one's perspective, so does cutting a tree or two down. One comes to appreciate the entire cycle. Perhaps the guy who lived here before me had my development in mind when he planted specimens known to grow fast and then die in hot‑summer climates.

Some trees out-and-out die, but I have two whose tops died while the rest of the tree was still green. Who knows, they might have quite a few years left. In the meantime, dead tops look crummy and are worth taking down. Rope helps with getting the top to fall in the desired direction.

These tops aren't ladder‑accessible, but at least the trees are climbable. A neighbor asked about the danger of cutting off the part of the tree you've tied yourself to. My sense is, if you can't remember to cut higher than the point you've tied off to, you probably shouldn't be doing this kind of work. yesterday evening
The second in an occasional series.
Yes, I am easily amused (although the
first instance was more curious, I think).
Callipepla californica   ♂ In a dream this afternoon, a professor was promoting a norm of discourse that deprecated phrasing sex partners as subject and object of a transitive verb. He showed the class a drawing of two people engaging in sexual congress and said, "Both faces show active enthusiasm, in keeping with our current view."

Shades of Monty Python. This is supposed to be a happy occasion. Let's not bicker and argue over who ....ed who. Lepus californicus
Still life with rabbit.
Fred
The ontological argument for the existence of dog is due to St. Anselm.

Consider the most perfect beast imaginable. As existence is a virtue, a most perfect beast would be lacking a key element of perfection if it did not in fact exist. Therefore, dog exists. Q.E.D.
friends visiting
House guests.
Larus californicus
Gulls.
The UK's NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) asked for suggestions on what to name a big research ship soon to be under construction. Boaty McBoatface got the most votes, with other suggestions including What Iceberg, Big Shipinnit, and Science!!! .

No dice said the powers that be, leading to headlines like "British officials unlikely to name new polar vessel Boaty McBoatface".

This is as good a time as any to note that H.M.S. Pinafore is an anagram of namer of ship.